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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 207 (some duplicates have been removed)
, the bill to save the economy went down to defeat in the house of representatives. >> the legislation has failed. >> i'm very disappointed in today's vote. >> so to the democrats skprerep who vetoed this bill yesterday, i say step up to the plate. >> this is what brought us to the brink of collapse. >> wow. all because annie went and got a house he couldn't afford? >> i don't know whose fault that was. >> $1.2 trillion in market value wiped out in one day. congress quickly reconvened, and four days later, on october 3rd, it passed the $700 billion troubled asset relief program. >> congress has agreed to a broad deal that authorizes the presidential secretary to free up the criticisms. that may be the last time the president witnessed something that really mattered to washington. four years later, and on the eve of another election, he's being asked, are you better off off than they were. but how much money could you have? if washington had put aside its pride, they could work with some people. >> these two have had your back. sheila baer's job was to deal with banks. neil's job was to be
measures are identified. the eurozone remains the greatest risk for the global economy today. as i said earlier on, the ecb move from two weeks ago with the omc was clearly a turning point. but the countries have to really work together much more cohesively in a much more coordinated manner and order together turned the corner. as you know, european union and the eurozone in particular are not the only threats on the horizon. the united states is also currently a threat. the immediate concern is, many of you know that, is that under the current law there would be a dramatic tightening equal to about 4% of gdp. that's what is, refer to as the fiscal cliff. and that is good. it entails a contraction of 2% of gdp, and that is not good at all, especially if you consider the forecast of growth of the united states is pretty much in the range of 2%. so that is a racing any growth in the united states, would be the consequence of not dealing with the fiscal cliff and not dealing with the debt ceiling, which are both looming threats on the very short-term horizon. and it's not a threat just for
the economy went down to defeat in the house of representatives. >> the legislation has failed -- >> i'm very disappointed in today's vote. >> to the democrats and republicans who oppose this plan yesterday, i say, step up to the plate. >> investors panicked, the dow dropped 777 points. the biggest single day point loss to date. >> this is what brought us to the brink of collapse. >> wow. all because annie went and got a house that he could not afford? >> $1.2 trillion in market value wiped out in one day. it's really psychological at this point. >> congress quickly reconvened and four days later on october 3rd, it passed the $700 billion troubled asset relief program. >> congress has agreed to a broad deal that authorizes the treasury secretary to start releasing money to free up the credit systems. that may have been the last time persons witnessed bipartisan compromise on something that really mattered in washington. four years later and on the eve of another election, voters are being asked, are you better off than you were then? the answer is yes because it was that bad. but how much bet
measure of the size and strength of the economy in america. the reading of the gross domestic product shows the economy grew at a rate of 1 1/3 percent for the quarter down the previous reading of 1.7%. much of the change due to poor farm production in the midwest because of a severe drought. the dow jones industrial average broke a four-day losing streak on thursday with the best day in two weeks after fresh concerns about europe eased. the markets were down, however, on friday. consumer confidence jumped to the highest level in seven months in september. the conference board said the index rose 10% from august. the indicator is closely watched because consumer spending makes up 70% of the u.s. economy. >>> two important pieces of data for the housing mark were out. sales of new homes in august were down from july. the median price of a home rose by a record amount, 11%. pending home sales down slightly in the month of august. at least in part due to an inventory shortage. not enough homes available at the low end of the price range. >>> an apology from the apple ceo tim cook writing
all out in september, a hopeful sign that the u.s. economy may be picking up. >> tom: i'm tom hudson. ben bernanke defends his strategy at the federal reserve to do more to help the economy. >> susie: and how technology is making it possible for doctors to go paperless. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> susie: the first day of the new quarter, kicks off with a blue chip rally. investors were encouraged by a report showing that american factories were busy in september. a popular index of national factory activity rose to 51.5 last month, from 49.6 in august. it was the fastest pace of production since may. but that upbeat news was overshadowed by comments from federal reserve chief ben bernanke, saying the economy is not growing fast enough to bring down the unemployment rate. we'll have more on that in a moment. those two events led to volatile trading here on wall street. the dow rose about 78 points, but was up as much as 155 points earlier. the nasdaq drifted in and out of positive and negative territory, finally losing more than 2.5 points, and the s&p rose almost fo
questions after his speech. let's listen in. >> japan, of course, is the first modern economy to be trapped at the zero bound. interest rates close to zero. their experience foreshadowed the global financial crisis of 2008. the japanese had a stock market booming bust and a property boom and bust together which was roughly double the size, proportionally speaking, to the united states. it was a major shock to the economy. they have responded to it to a variety of tools. i think a couple things that we learned from watching their experience and troubles and difficulties they have been through and to that i would point to that we have tried to learn from them, the first is, aggressiveness, early aggressiveness of monetary policy. what we learned from japan is we learned from the 1930s. once you have a deflation, prices dropping, prices and wages are dropping, they can be very very hard to get out of that. there is a lot of downward pressure on the economy. we were very aggressive early on in the united states to avoid deflation and we have maintained inflation close to our 2% target which is
continue rising and consumers become more confident-- two bright spots of the economy. was the bank bailout overdone? hear what a former top regulator says about the rescue. former fdic chairman sheila bair joins us. and if american airlines and its pilots strike a deal tomorrow, it could mean fewer delays for customers and the company's bankruptcy. that and more tonight on nbr! captioning sponsored by wpbt >> tom: some encouraging news tonight for the housing market and consumer confidence. first, housing-- a measurement of prices in 20 cities across the country rose four tenths of a percent in july. that's the sixth straight month of gains for the s&p case- shiller home price index. and consumer's are feeling more optimistic. the conference board's confidence index rose to 70.3 in september, marking its highest level since february. these two groups, consumers and housing, are significant because of their influence over the entire economy. >> with the improvement in consumer confidence, we think that consumer spending could pick up as we go into next year. especially since the housing mar
president obama. but mitt isn't having it, trying to get ohio voters to the right by focusing on the economy. >> with incomes going down, every year, every year going down, down, down. prices of electricity up and health insurance up and the cost of gasoline, having doubled, these are tough times. even for families with jobs. i know what it takes to get this economy going again. cheryl: so what would a tax plan under a romney/ryan administration look like? rich edson breaks it down for us. rich? >> reporter: well, cheryl, democrats call it a giveaway to the rich at the expense of the middle class. republicans say they're wrong, and this morning governor romney defended his tax plan. >> by the way, don't be expecting a huge cut in taxes because i'm also going to lower deductions and exemptions. by bringing rates down, we'll be able to let small businesses keep more of their money to hire more people. >> in the end the details are really up to congress. romney's proposed cutting every tax rate by 20%. to insure the treasury department takes in about the same amount of money under a new system,
, but the fact he was not speaking optimistically about the economy and the effects of qe3 on the economy sent a damper on the stocks. a nice way to begin the day with 75 up on the dow, 3.6 on the s&p, and, again, nasdaq is the only one in the red. lauren: sometimes the fed tie doesn't list everything. silver ending at seven month highs. look at that. david: oil, a little of a rise, natural gas, though, we want to focus on natural gas because we have seen that thing grow for the past month or so. it was up 5% today. if you're looking for some play in energy, oil seems a little too hectic for you, go to natural gas. with ce get -- can we get that up there? okay. switch to airlines. lauren: they are seeing a pop today. as you see, there was a report out earlier saying the outlook for the airline industry is improving. that's a good sign. look at that. up arrows across the board. david: ibm, you knew it was a pick when warren buffet went in there. today, look at this, an all time 10-year high at the top there trading at $210.43 per share. that was a 1.5% jump today. a nice big move by ibm. fed ch
. if you don't believe me, look at the numbers that just came out in the growth of our economy. 1.3% verses russia at 4%. china at 7% to 8%. we're at 1.3%. this is unacceptable. it is not working. i know what it takes to get us working. he's put us on a road to europe. europe doesn't work in europe. i want to get us back to being america where people come here, build enterprises here. we fulfill american dreams. we keep the hope alive in america. [ cheers and applause ] and this matters. you know this matters. this counts. it counts for the 23 million people struggling to get a job, getting a better job today. it counts for the young peoe. today we wonder whether that's true. the majority of americans don't think that's the case. this matters. there's one more sense in which it matters. that's what i began with, and that is our military capability. our ability to defend our liberty and the liberty of our friends around the world, with whom we trade and with whom we trade and whose prosperity depends on our trade. i was in poland and got the chance to meet a hero. i came in and he said, mr.
's a point you made earlier in an earlier segment that the bottom line is the economy is still very, very weak. i'll tell you, we've been on overweight equities for the last six or nine months. we're now starting to pull back some of the risk. yes, the market could rally higher. i don't see the stimulus up as much as i did when everybody didn't believe qe-3 was coming. i think there's more negative potential headlines. we're taking risk off the table right now and hopefully we'll re-enter at a lower position. >> it's interesting. rickntelli, the fiscal cliff keeps coming up. that's one of the biggest issues in terms of keeping businesses from making any real decisions here, putting money to work, and it's also the highlight going into the election. >> it is. i guess the real irony is even if the fiscal cliff didn't exist, the outlook economically, both domestically and globally, is deteriorating. really, it's a bit of a double whammy. i'll go back to what i said the last time we discussed this an hour ago. if you look at the 21 weeks from mid-october to march of 2000 when the nasdaq crash
: nicole thank you. dagen: take a look at this. the u.s. economy growing at a very weak 1.3% in the second quarter, revised down from 1.7%. that is, well, lousy. connell: deputy editor at the "wall street journal"'s editorial page is here to tell us it's always the economy, stupid, at least that was your column? >> that's right. and any presidential election one way or another it is going to be about the economy, no matter how hard the candidates try to deny that. the most amazing one perhaps of all time is indeed the incumbent obama who is running as though the economy during his term didn't happen or at least if it happened, it was the fault of somebody who was president four years before him and what he wants to talk about is the economy he's going to create starting in january 13 which will consist of people having green jobs, making windmills and solar panels. i think the american voters are probably getting a little bit frustrated that no one will talk about the economy as it exists right now, dropping to 1.3% in the second quarter. the united states economy is barely, barely moving.
to stimulate the economy. again, i put stimulate in quotes because who knows if it is momentary for china. >> we have this bump of china of 2.5%, you can't underestimate the short-term tailwind, whatever they have for the economic expansion, especially on commodities prices. that is part of the reason why we have a significant progress. david: were you aware of all this? that is basically what it is. were you worry about it? >> i am very suspicious and wary. however, i don't think that the close is clear. a little bit underweight equities, as you well know, a lot longer for state solvents. david: keep the sound there. i want to hear there is any interaction. tim is joining us right now. when we think about these honeypots in the market? >> i agree with him. the market is clearly ignoring the negative news that we are seeing in the u.s. and the fact that we are in a recession and maybe longer in europe. it is not deterring people from buying stocks right now. you could certainly call it a bubble in general. i think equities was probably overheated here. given the weak industrial numbers, g
, as the presidential candidates focus on the economy, what do the mixed signals mean? we get perspective from two economists. >> woodruff: then, we go on board navy ships in the persian gulf to watch a massive military exercise aimed at securing the strait of hormuz. >> we need to be prepared to deal with mines go in the water. this exercise is focused on the mine trip and demonstrating our able to clear mines. we have to be able to do that. >> suarez: the chinese communist party ousts a once-powerful politician and prepares to unveil its new leadership. margaret warner has our update. >> woodruff: mark shields and david brooks analyze the weeks news. >> suarez: and from our "american graduate" series, we take an encore look at the story of an eighth grader who turns to journalism to tackle violence in his middle school. >> if i didn't have a-- i would probably be let up with the wrong people and doing the wrong stuff. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> bnsf and carnegie corporation. >> and with the ongoing support o
to do something like this? >> i think it would be a reference back. because the economy takes all the oxygen out of the election with a little bit of foreign affairs, the supreme court does not play against undecided voters. it is a motivator to get out and get to the polls. you want this person to replace justice ginsberg when she retires for example. you want to know if there's any practical experience, and the obama at the lustration has declined to defend the defense of marriage act. present romney might decide he would defend the constitutionality of that statute. it does seem like that has a lot of salience and presidential debates. i.t. think it will not happen. here is why. no major national political figure has attacked as publicly since 1996 or before. it is remarkable. the republicans were seeing some political profit in attacking affirmative action given the polls. they do not do it anymore. john kerry said maybe it is time to stop these racial preferences. the democratic leadership council was inching down that road. that is all gone. this is why we get so demonized i
in advertising revenue. this is due to the internet and sluggish u.s. economy. the firm has been taking various streamlining measures that include cutting 2,000,000 jo jo. 10% of the work force. despite actions, the company posted a loss in first time in four quarters. "the new york times" decided to appoint bbc general director as its new top executive. he is nonto have improved the web services of the bbc is is expected to bolster the newspaper company's online businesses. >>> british bankers association says it is willing to give up control over the libor bank rate. as it looks to prevent further rate rigging scandals. the association says libor is based on interest rates charged between banks in the london market. in june, major british bank, barclays was fined for manipulating libor through false reporting. a staement released tuesday indicating they would transfer libor related to a public body. by making the announcement, the association is seen as trying to ease criticism about the way the rate has been handled over a quarter century. and the british government plans to publish a final
and the sovereign bond market and watch the politicians fail to do what's necessary to get these economies to grow. you have to stabilize the patient before you try and fission their long-term problems. the politicians don't do this. that means europe stays in a recession. for u.s. investors, i think it is still something of a side show. >> something of a side show. until they either come up with the austerity or -- something's got to give, right? >> because it doesn't disrupt the u.s. economy. the u.s. economy is still growing. our exports to europe are only a very small part of our gdp. the housing market recovery is much more important to the improvement of wealth. we're seeing some improvement of confidence. we're seeing rising home prices. all these are more important to the united states than what's going on in europe. >> mark, how do you see it? you invested in europe these days or no? >> a little bit, maria. you know, i guess the thing i would say about europe and soon to watch on our shores is you're going to pay more and get less. i look forward to the dislocation between price and value
on persuading voters they can boost the economy. but a key question at the heart of it all-- is the economy slowing, stalling, or perhaps even gaining strength in some ways? new data are sending conflicting signs. republican presidential nominee mitt romney campaigned today at a military academy in pennsylvania. romney promised better jobs for young people like the cadets sitting behind him and a better future for the entire country. >> we're in a very different road than what i think the people of the world expected from the united states of america. and if i'm elected president of this country, i will get us back on a road of growth and prosperity and strength. >> woodruff: today at a campaign event in washington, president obama shared a message of what he called "economic patriotism" tied to a strong middle class. >> but our problems can be solved, our challenges can be met. we've still got the workers in the world, the best universities, the best scientists, the best... we got the best stuff. ( laughter ) we just got to bring it together. >> woodruff: consumer confidence is higher of l
zero economy. the past ten years, zero jobs growth, zero wage growth, zero stock returns. which part of that equation is the most crippling? >> i think all of them. if you think about the middle class, where they need jobs, they need wage growth. we've seen average meaning household income actually go nowhere and importantly in their 401(k)s have become 201 ks, they need robust stock returns. if we're going to get wage growth and jobs growth clearly we have to do, as the guest said, we have to restore the manufacturing base. one good news i have in this triple zero economy, i think going forward the next decade for stock returns will be a lot better than the last decade. the reason is simple and somewhat troubling. first of all, if you think about the stock market here in america, it's physically located here but increasingly, its returns are located elsewhere. >> sorry to interrupt you. the very thing that's been a trend many would say hurtful for american workers is the thing that can help american investors because these are companies that don't necessarily need american workers.
views on the global economy and perhaps you could start with europe and make your way around the world and perspective on what you see in terms of growth and perhaps more importantly you know, what are the challenges that we are going to have to deal with over the next period of time? >> there's not enough time for all the challenges but let me give you some perspective. let me get to -- let me give away the punchline. the punchline is i think in a world races, the world is not going to come to coming to an end. we are going to muddle through but there are a lot of challenges and a lot of risks that i think the largest outcome come the largest for signage likely outcome by far is that we get through it and a lot of action were to be taken to offer some relief but there are several things that could cause things to derail in which case it would be a lot tougher for a lot longer. but you asked about europe. i think the biggest problem that europe has is growth and the risk problem is the go off the rail, bus stop of the euro. a few months ago we would have said that the two big issues fo
such difficulty, you know, in the economy because of federal reserve policy. likelihood of hearing this, very very slim. and maybe seeing how would you balance a budget? in our campaign we had a precise plan of cutting a trillion dollars and balancing the budget in three years. you know, we're in this horrendous crisis and neither one of them are going to say anything, oh, maybe we ought to cut something. there's no proposal to cut anything. it's also tinkering around with massive automatic increases and the american people are starting to wake up and realize it is all fiction and they are not serious. connell: congressman paul, thanks as always. >> thanks. connell: fox business network, beginning at 8:00 p.m. eastern live from denver, neil cavuto will be on the next hour to talk about the debate. neil cavuto. dagen: the economy will be a big focus of tonight's debate. adp the payroll processing firm came out earlier this morning and reported that 162,000 private sector jobs were added last month. more than expected. to weigh in on that, and the debate, the head of u.s. interest rate strategy at u
's not forget we also had a dismal report on durable goods orders, once again showing weakness in this economy. investors not worried about these numbers today. >> we got decent news out of europe and china this morning. either way, we're asking if investors should think twice before buying into this kind of a rally based on what the u.s. economy is telling us right now. let's talk about it in today's "closing bell" exchange. we have larry blazer from mayflower advisers and our own rick santelli and mandy drury. larry glazer, you happen to believe that economically there's an iceberg dead ahead. this market doesn't act like it today. >> no, it doesn't. you can see today investors are so focused on the global stimlouse story that they're missing the big picture. the big picture is the fact that the economic data, particularly global manufacturing data, is absolutely rolling over. look at chinese manufacturing, down 11 months in a row. you hit the nail on the head. gdp, durable goods, all a sign of weakness. the problem is the catalysts are behind us and the icebergs are ahead. you've got the fi
-oriented economy. japan began sending aid and loaned over the years. the japanese prime minister had inflamed tensions after he took office in 2001 with annual business to the shrine in tokyo that honored the war dead and war criminals. china's economy grew year after year. members of the olympic committee underscored the emergence when they named beijing host of the summer games. two years later, china passed japan to be the world's second largest economy. a chinese fishing collided with japanese patrol vessels in thes en kaku islands. the collision parked widespread protests and angered many japanese. a recent survey suggests animosities are running high. the poll put anti-chinese sentiment at 84%, a record high. 65% of chinese respondents expressed negative views of japan. >> those figures suggest they will be challenged to mend relations, but an expert said it may not be as difficult size it appears. >> japan and chiba have been close are than before. we have thousands of years of relationships, but now is the best in a sense that economic exchange and people to people exchange and the le
for life, and until last july he was italy's minister of economy and finance. but he is not exactly a politician. as a respect economist considered be abo party politics he was chosen to form a new technocratic government. it put him at the center of the european debt crisis confronting rising interest rates that led to greece, ireland, and portugal to seek bailouts. his ability to turn calamity into opportunity has revived his nickname "super mario." i have pleased to have him here at this table for the first time. welcome. >> delighted to be here. >> rose: i see that you have said that you're not going to run for pri minister? >> no, i can confirm that i will not be a candidate. i believe i couldn't even be a candidate because, as you mentioned, i am senator for life. so candidates are candidates inn order to become members of parliament. >> rose: and you're senator for life. >> yes. >> rose: do you want to stay as prime minister? >> of course i will not. i will-- the whole government will have to resign when the elections take place, probably next-- after that, it will be for th
the rest of the economy has started to feel the effect from the sluggish manufacturing sector. if you look at the breakdown of the services pmi, the construction services sub index -- meanwhile, new orders were dragged lower by demand weakness for transportation. over in australia, a survey showed an even grimmer picture as its services index dipped to 41.9 in september. india reports its all important services pmi tomorrow, while hsbc is out next monday. that's all from me. >> thank you very much. >>> coming up on today's show, we head to paris to find out more, the attempts to offload his unit. then to hong kong where we examine the political transition in china plagued by scandals and disappearances. we get an expert view on the new leadership change. >>> and next, washington and its debate tonight as romney and obama finally square off. we'll have a preview of what to expect and what's at stake with our very own democrat-republican panel. >>> and real estate is on the rise. we head to new york with founder barbara corcoran. mariano rajoy has denied reports that spain will request a bai
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 207 (some duplicates have been removed)